Lean

Standardize Work Process To Provide Customers Better Products & Services

Much of the work we do consists of repetitive tasks:  changing a die in a stamping press, closing the books every month or running a weekly or monthly meeting.  These repetitive tasks can be studied and improved to make them more efficient, reliable, easier, safer, and more productive.  We  then document the best method and teach it to everyone associated with the task.  This will make...

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Invest in Employees And Make Them The Center of Your Lean Transformation

Much has been written about why few organizations succeed in making a lean transformation.  Some have stated the number to be less than 10% and when compared with Toyota the number becomes even worse and as low as 1%.  What is the reason for this?  What’s missing? I think it centers on employee involvement and not making employees the center of the lean transformation.  Companies that...

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Lean Implementation: Insights from Henry Ford and Taiichi Ohno

  Henry Ford and Taiichi Ohno were pioneers in Lean implementation.  But with all their success, why is it that less than 20% of manufactures are able to successfully implement Lean?  This article will try to show how you must take the basic concepts of lean and apply them to each specific environment to be successful. Both Ford and Ohno were obsessed with creating flow.  The reason...

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Increase Profitability Utilizing Lean And Theory of Constraints

The goal of every company is to make money.  In order for that to happen companies must increase net profit, while simultaneously increasing return on investment and cash flow. In Eliyahu Goldratt’s book, The Goal, he states there are three measurements that express the goal of making money: throughput, inventory, and operational expense.  Throughput is the rate at which the system...

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Ten Steps To Analyze And Improve A Product Or Service Using A Value Stream Map

Many processes suffer from inefficiency, mistakes, errors, defects, downtime and late delivery due to the waste inherent in them.  The waste I’m referring to are: Transportation Inventory Motion Waiting Over-processing Over-production Defects Safety These waste exists because most of the time it’s the way the process has always been done and no one questions it or looks for the...

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Use Value Stream Maps to Understand Process, Information, and Material Flow

  Value stream maps are very useful in analyzing processes because they help identify ways to improve flow and eliminate waste and non-value-added (NVA) activities.  Value stream mapping can also help you achieve other objectives: Establish a baseline for improvement Determine where bottlenecks occur in the process Measurement of key metrics, such as cycle time, downtime, yield,...

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